Vice President of India, Shri Hamid Ansari addressing AIMA JRD Tata Award

Shri Hamid Ansari, the (then) Vice President of India, addressing AIMA – JRD Tata Corporate Leadership Award ceremony. 

Shri Hamid Ansari, Vice President of India addressing AIMA JRD Tata Award Ceremony

Shri Hamid Ansari, Vice President of India addressing AIMA JRD Tata Award Ceremony

Shri Sunil Munjal, Shri Chandrashekhar, Shri Mohandas Pal, Shri Nikhil Swahney, Shri Sanjay Kirloskar, Miss Rekha Sethi, distinguished guests, ladies, and gentlemen. Some years back two management gurus had postulated that in a complex and dynamic global competitive environment adaptive capability is the key to survival and growth and that Indian businesses will find themselves on the road to rapid growth when they learn to think and act adaptively. The challenge before the Indian corporate sector today in the face of continuing low level of global growth and rapid changes in the technology of production and preferences of the end consumers is how to sustain their growth in times of recession that endangers protectionist regimes while competing in a fast evolving technological landscape.

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President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee Commemorating AIMA’s Diamond Jubilee Year

To celebrate its Diamond Jubilee Year,  All India Management Association organized a special session with The President of India, Shri Pranab Mukherjee at Rashtrapati Bhavan on June 7, 2017. 

Shri Pranab Mukherjee commemorating AIMA's Diamond Jubilee Celebrations

Shri Pranab Mukherjee addressing ‘Special Session to commemorate AIMA’s Diamond Jubilee Year’ 

It’s pleasure for me to be present amongst you this evening when we are celebrating the Diamond Jubilee of AIMA. You can be proud of sustaining a culture of excellence for six decades. The achievements of the last sixty years, I am sure shall motivate you to even greater heights in the years to come. When you began your journey in 1957, the country was entered into the phase of industrialization, because the major industrial policy thrust was given in 1956 industrial policy resolution. It was the launching of the second five year plan period and subsequently, you have seen how India progressed. And from a country when it began its independence 70 years ago and 10 years before you began your journey, it was one of the poorest countries in the world for more than half a century. From 1900 to 1950 the economy registered just below 1 percent annual average GDP growth. India was in deficit. At that juncture, your organization took a giant leap I must say, not in darkness but with definite aims and objectives that we must come out, fully exploit our potentials, particularly amongst our youth. Give them managerial tools, sharpen their skills and make them the best available many years to manage. It is not merely the management of material. It is also the management of the ethos, their culture and also to carry on the legacy of a heritage which is of 5000 years old civilization.

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Making India Easy & Simple – Amitabh Kant, CEO, NITI Aayog at NLC2017

Mr Amitabh Kant, CEO, NITI Aayog talks about how the current government’s reforms to make India Easy and Simple; at AIMA’s 3rd National Leadership Conclave 2017.

Amitabh Kant, CEO, NITI Aayog sharing his thoughts on Government and Business: What Should be the New Equation? at #AIMANLC

Amitabh Kant, CEO, NITI Aayog sharing his thoughts on Government and Business: What Should be the New Equation? at #AIMANLC

It’s great pleasure to be here on this very fascinating subject of government and business. My belief is that the government’s job is to lay down the policy framework and the private sector’s job is to create wealth in society and if you look at India over the years, the government had itself made India very complicated, very complex and a very difficult place to do business because over the years we have added a lots of rules, regulations, procedures, paper work, acts, all of them. And these procedures and paper works have made it very difficult for the private sector to create wealth and therefore this particular government in the last two and half years has attempted to make things extremely easy and simple. They have scrapped  1198 laws. This is unparalleled, unheard in India’s history so a lot of laws have been scrapped. It has tried to make India easy and simple for the private sector to do business. For instance, the number of forms for import and exports was 11 and 9 which has been brought down to a mere 3. You can register a company in one day today. You can register startup in just about an hour and MSME in just 5 minutes today. So the entire focus of this government has been to make India easy and simple, cut down paper work,  digitize everything and put everything online. And since most businesses are done in their state, the government’s view is that states become easy and simple and therefore we initiated the competition among states. We ranked states, we said we will name and shame states.States were ranked, a year before Gujarat came number one. But last year in the ease of doing business Gujarat was dethroned and Telangana and Andhra became number one. But the good part was that Jharkhand and Chattisgarh moved up. And they have done a lot of reforms. So similarly my view is that the government must create a huge sense of competition among the states and put it in public domain. And we are doing the same thing in education, in health, in water management from NITI AYOG on outcomes.

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Shashi Tharoor speaks on India’s SoftPower

shashi tharoor speaking on India's Soft Power

shashi tharoor speaking on India’s Soft Power

Mr Shashi Tharoor, Member of Parliament, Lok Sabha and Chairman, Parliamentary Standing Committee on External Affairs speaks on India’s SoftPower at AIMA’s 3rd National Leadership Conclave 2017.

Good morning to all of you here.  I can take a little bit of credit for having brought this issue (Soft Power) into the Indian context. In fact I was in the States and a fairly good friend of Joseph Nye, so I asked him do you mind if I try and apply your theories to India and he didn’t mind at all and so about 15 years ago I wrote a piece about India’s soft power and sent it to him and said what do you think and he was totally supportive and ever since I have sort of gone on a bit of a crusade in this country both before returning to it full time and then subsequently after my return to India delivering multiple lectures and it finally had the effect that the phrase ‘soft power’ entered into our lexicon and the ultimate gratification came when the Prime Minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh started using this in his speeches.

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Importance of Creativity & Storytelling in a Digital Age – Rishi Jaitly, CEO, Times Global

Mr Rishi Jaitley, CEO – Times Global & Former Twitter India head sharing his top 5 insights on the topic ‘Strategies for a Data Economy’ at AIMA’s 3rd National Leadership Conclave 2017.

Rishi Jaitly at NLC 2017

Rishi Jaitly at NLC 2017

Hi everybody, it’s great to be here and particularly in a conference where we are not just talking about the data economy but I know the theme of the gathering is about Asia more generally and how we ought to be thinking about the next 10 years.

I am going to take a slightly different approach. What I want to talk about is that; we are existing in an economy that is increasingly data driven, where consumers are being asked to engage digitally and I think the question I would ask does it change how we as businesses, as nonprofits, as brands, as leaders interact with consumers and if so, how? And I guess what I’m going to suggest that in a data economy, creativity, storytelling, culture matter even more. So if you’re interested in reaching consumers in a noisy era where they are living on digital increasingly, where personalization is a turnkey service offered by vendors everywhere. I guess what I would poses and what I’m going to run through is the personality of your brand, the extent to which your product thinks about culture, behaves like a human and touches people emotively, emotionally matters even more in that economy. And so I’m going to run through five insights that I think might help guide how you think about going to market in this new world. And all of these issues, by the way, are particularly true in Asia and of course in India where I think consumers are in any case more likely to be moved by what I call culture storytelling and more.

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HR will be dead by 2020 – Vineet Nayar at the 14th National HRM Summit

The 14th HRM National Summit of AIMA featured some of the top HR professionals and delegates from Industry, Government, Media, and Academia.  Below is an excerpt from an enlightening speech by Mr. Vineet Nayar, Founder, & Chairman Sampark Foundation and Former CEO, HCL Technologies at the 14th National HRM Summit on the topic ‘HR Organisation in the Age of Automation’.

Vineet Nayar addressing 14th National HRM Summit

Vineet Nayar addressing 14th National HRM Summit

When I talk to HR community I am reminded of a CEO I met a few years ago. This was the CEO of the company called Kodak and especially people of my age would remember that each one of us had a Kodak moment of our life where we took very selective photographs because you could take only a few photos at a time. The world was different at that time, it has changed now. And When I met that CEO I asked him “Didn’t you know that the digital photography will make Kodak, as a company, obsolete?”. He told me that he knew about it at least 10 years before. I am an advisor to the McKinsey Leadership institute when I met the McKinsey team which was involved in advising Kodak, I asked them that if they knew ten years in advance that Kodak was about to die why didn’t  they do something about it. They told me that they did  a very interesting research, over 6 decades, of the companies who lost their market share and there were two conclusions: Anybody who loses market share or becomes obsolete knows at least 5 years in advance that they are going to become obsolete and the only reason they become obsolete is because they don’t do anything about it. So they were the part of the gang that became obsolete.

So one thing I would definitely predict is that the HR is going to be dead by 2020. The three megatrends change happening in the world will make the HR job obsolete.

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TV Mohandas Pai talks about ‘Automation’ at 14th HRM Summit

AIMA organized its 14th HRM National Summit on 1st December 2016 at New Delhi. The Summit featured some of the top HR professionals and delegates from Industry, Government, Media, and Academia. Over 250 professionals from across India participated in the Summit.

Below is an excerpt from a very informative speech by Mr. TV Mohandas Pai, Sr. Vice President, AIMA and Chairperson, Manipal Global Education Services at 14th National HRM Summit on the topic ‘Jobs in the Era of Automation’.

Mohandas Pai at AIMA's 14th National HRM Summit

Mohandas Pai at AIMA’s 14th National HRM Summit

” For the last many years AIMA has been holding the HR summit and every time we chose a cutting edge topic, primarily because we believe in the power of ideas. Ideas have moved civilizations, ideas have moved societies, and we believe at AIMA that we must be at the cutting edge with new ideas looking at what is happening in the world and that’s why we’ve chosen this very important topic – Jobs in Era of Automation.

 Automation has been there for a pretty long period of time starting with the invention of the steam engine. Imagine the world before the machine was invented. The world was based upon labor, human muscle, and animal power. And the wealth of a nation depended upon the size of the population. So China and India, were the richest countries and the greatest countries in the world because they had very large population. And in the mid 18th century China-India made up to 45% of the world GDP and there was trade from Europe with the rest of the world. But then a very singular event happened in the Great Britain when the steam engine was invented and suddenly you could use kinetic energy for motive power and create the machine which could do the work of many human beings, particularly where there was heavy use of human or animal power. And it meant that the heavy work and heavy lifting suddenly could be done very differently, it could be repeated, it could be standardized, and that set off a chain of events which changed the face of civilization on the planet.

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Arnab Goswami shares his Insights & Stories at InsightStorm

AIMA and Storm the Norm co-created ‘Insight Storm’ – a novel format to generate sharp insights delivered powerfully. The Inaugural InsightStorm was organized on 10th August 2016 at Hotel Taj Lands End, Mumbai. This edition of InsightStorm paired up thought leaders from two diverse fields – Art and Business and in a 30-minute session, they shared three pre-created insights around a theme, followed it up with a ‘collision dialogue’ and ended with one fresh insight each.

Below are the key insights & stories shared by Mr Arnab Goswami, Editor-in-chief, Times Now and ET Now at Insight Storm.

Arnab Goswami sharing his Insights & Stories at InsightStorm

Arnab Goswami sharing his Insights & Stories at InsightStorm

Insight: The rules spoil the journey. We have too many rules which are taught to us at various stages of our career. It limits you. It stops making you imaginative and following the rule makes you less risky a person. That’s negative in the long term, yeah.

Story: The rules spoil the journey because the rule in journalism was – Don’t speak your mind, Don’t talk, just report. Be factual. Don’t go beyond the facts. Just restrict yourself to the facts and keep it to that. That was the rule in 1995. I find that 21 years later that rule is obsolete. Doesn’t mean that facts are immaterial, facts should be compromised, No. But in today’s day and age, opinion counts and the world is opening up. Everyone, everybody has a point of view. Around seven or eight years back, we took the fairly bold decision of changing the editorial nature of the program I do in the way it just got constructed. You can’t have a very structured dialogue so you begin speaking up and you begin giving your own point of view. The joke now is that you end up becoming less an anchor and more one of the panelists and the loudest panelist of them all. But you know it works because it is freer, It is more unfettered, It is not restrained, It helps you open up and so what if it was the Golden Rule in journalism never to express your point of view. That rule wasn’t set in stone. It’s not a religious edict, you changed it. Has journalism become worse for that? I don’t think so because I can’t report a CWG scam and then move on to the next story. I have to report a scam and tell people what I think about it. I can’t report a story of a mother and daughter getting raped you know and just move on to the next story. I feel I think, I emote, I am a citizen, I am a human being and so when I am going to come on air, I am going to be a human being too. So the rule was changed and for me, it has actually made my professional journey, personal journey much more enjoyable which is why I still stand here before you hoping I have another 20 years in this business. If I had just done journalism the way it was taught to me in 95 then I would not be here today and perhaps be retiring so yeah that’s one little story I would like to share.

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Insight Storm: Dia Mirza shares her Insights & Story

AIMA and Storm the Norm co-created ‘Insight Storm’ – a novel format to generate sharp insights delivered powerfully. The Inaugural InsightStorm was organized on 10th August 2016 at Hotel Taj Lands End, Mumbai. This edition of InsightStorm paired up thought leaders from two diverse fields – Art and Business and in a 30-minute session, they shared three pre-created insights around a theme, followed it up with a ‘collision dialogue’ and ended with one fresh insight each.

Below are the 3 key insights and stories shared by Ms Dia Mirza, Model, Actor, Producer and Social Activist at Insight Storm.

Dia Mirza addressing the Insight Storm 2016

Dia Mirza addressing the Insight Storm 2016

Insight: Every individual is positive social change waiting to happen. Awareness plus Communication equals thoughts translating into action, simple Maths.

I was 18 years old when I won a beauty pageant and it made me a household name overnight in India and amongst many opportunities that came my way at the time, some of the opportunities made a huge impact on the way I perceive my own life and this incredible opportunity that had come my way. I was approached by the government of Andhra Pradesh to spread awareness on HIV and AIDS and we worked actively on that campaign for a year and statistics showed results and that made a big difference in the way I perceived the opportunity that had come along. I think in our early years when we are growing up, through our school education, there are many models and systems that encourage us to become participators, social participators to make a difference in people’s lives. I think as children we receive the gratitude that we get through that experience but as we grow older and start chasing life’s ambitions and wanting to do more with ourselves to make money, to grow, to become more successful we sometimes forget the gratitude that we’ve received in making a difference and I think it was somewhere in 2003 or 2004, many years after I had continued to participate in many social initiatives that I discovered that I could combine what I do with what it makes me feel. So the pursuit of opportunity did not necessarily have to be one that only correlated to the ambition to do better in life materially but also to make a difference alongside. And that was life changing for me because I haven’t looked back at a single day when I haven’t felt like my existence is not entirely insignificant and that this great opportunity life has given me in expanding my access to people to make a change and use all of it that I do through my everyday work which is whether it is making films or acting in films or anything else that I do, combine that with the social change that I would like to make and seek to make. And it’s been my key to happiness. I have made money along the way but more than that I have earned a lot of gratitude and that’s my key to happiness and I think everybody is seeking happiness eventually so yeah.

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Insight Storm: Kabir Bedi shares his insights

AIMA and Storm the Norm co-created ‘Insight Storm’ – a novel format to generate sharp insights delivered powerfully. The Inaugural InsightStorm was organized on 10th August 2016 at Hotel Taj Lands End, Mumbai. This edition of InsightStorm paired up thought leaders from two diverse fields – Art and Business and in a 30-minute session, they shared three pre-created insights around a theme, followed it up with a ‘collision dialogue’ and ended with one fresh insight each.

Below is an excerpt from the speech of Mr Kabir Bedi, Indian television and Film actor at Insight Storm.

Mr Kabir Bedi, Indian television and Film actor addressing InsightStorm

Mr Kabir Bedi, Indian television and Film actor addressing InsightStorm

I want to thank AIMA, Ranjan Malik, Anisha Motwani and everyone in this room for including me in this very distinguished gathering of people. Lincoln did not become president of America because he was born in Lockhart, Narendra Modi did not become prime minister of India because he was a tea seller, Lal Bahadur Shastri did not become prime minister of India because he was a teacher’s son, Ambedkar did not write the constitution because he studied under lamp post.  All of them recognized something within them that was superior to the circumstances that surrounded them and they did something about it. So motivation is a very important factor. What is it that actually motivates to act your realization?

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